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NCEA Guidlines

Page history last edited by Bowie 8 years, 11 months ago

Cubism and Abstraction 1900-1930

Suggested content: Cubism, Orphism, Futurism, Abstraction.

Teachers are encouraged to include artists of their choice. It is recommended, however, that programmes include study of the following artists:

Picasso, Braque, Gris, Sonia and Robert Delaunay, Leger, Balla, Boccioni, Mondrian, Brancusi, Malevich.

Explanation: The above recommended artists are representative of the art movements listed in the suggested content.

 

Modern American Art

Suggested content: Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Feminist Art, Realism, Super Realism

Teachers are encouraged to include artists of their choice. It is recommended, however, that programmes include study of the following artists:

Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman, Helen Frankenthaler, Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg, Judy Chicago, Miriam Schapiro, Barbara Kruger, Cindy Sherman, Edward Hopper, George Segal, Robert Estes, Audrey Flack, Duane Hanson.

Explanation: Sculpture and Postmodernism have been deleted as specified aspects in the suggested content list. The area of study has been very large making it difficult to cover sculpture, and Postmodernism, as discrete aspects. Some sculpture is included in other content areas (e.g. Oldenburg's sculptures) and much of the art studied is Postmodern. The change from the Women's Art Movement to Feminist Art recognises that not all Feminist artists were identified with the Women's Art Movement arising in the 1970s in America, and that Feminist art is still being made.

 

Modern New Zealand Art

Suggested content: Expressionism, Abstraction, Feminist Art, Contemporary Māori Art, contemporary diversity.

Teachers are encouraged to include artists of their choice as it is recognised that there are many representative artists for the above-mentioned content. It is recommended, however, that programmes include study of the following artists:

Colin McCahon, Ralph Hotere, Gretchen Albrecht, Tony Fomison, Philip Clairmont, Jeffrey Harris, Carole Shepheard, Jacqueline Fahey, Shane Cotton, Michael Parekowhai, Jacqueline Fraser, Robin Kahukiwa, John Pule, Fatu Feu'u, Neil Dawson, Richard Killeen, Megan Jenkinson.

Explanation: A key change in the suggested content is the deletion of representational art and Regionalism. There has been overlap between the content taught at Level 2 and Level 3. In order to rationalise the two levels and to maintain a focus on Modern Art in New Zealand for Level 3, representational art and Regionalism have been removed. The change from the Women's Art Movement to Feminist Art recognises that not all Feminist artists were identified with the Women's Art Movement in New Zealand, and that Feminist Art is still being made.

Postmodernism has been replaced with contemporary diversity to recognise the diversity of artists and approaches that currently exists, and is likely to continue to exist, in New Zealand art. Stylistic diversity, cultural diversity, and artists working with diverse media are some examples of diversity of art in New Zealand at the present time. Teachers are able to select content that is appropriate to their students, for example, an investigation of Pasifika art, or time-based art. The recommended artists listed above provide a starting point for consideration of contemporary diversity in New Zealand art with the inclusion of Pasifika artists such as John Pule and Fatu Feu'u, photographer Megan Jenkinson, sculptor Neil Dawson, and the figuration of Richard Killeen.

 

Source: http://artsonline2.tki.org.nz/resources/ncea/AH_guidelines.php

 

Not sure if this is the updated version. It's best to not get our hopes up, maybe

 

 

 

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